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10 Tips On Surviving Senior Year

memory book 22 1 10 Tips On Surviving Senior Year1.Take college application seriously.

If you didn't start your junior year, the beginning of senior year is when you need to decide which schools you will visit and which schools you'll apply to.

2.Make an appointment with your guidance counselor.

If you feel overwhelmed by the number of schools to which you could apply, you're not alone. The good news is that your guidance counselor is sitting in his or her office right now with stacks and stacks of materials to help you develop a list of schools to apply to.

3. Get Rid of What You Don't Need

If you're not already inundated with marketing materials from every college in the land, you will be by the end of your visit with your guidance counselor. Do yourself a favor. If you know a school does not appeal to you, don't take the brochures. If they get mailed to your house, throw them away. Though you should probably consider some schools that aren't you're magically perfect ideal, there are also some that you will know just are not right. For example, if you have no intention of moving to Maine, then you don't need to hang onto that Bowdoin brochure any longer.

4.Keep Track of What You Do Need

You've met with your guidance counselor; you know which schools you want to investigate if not apply to. Your guidance counselor has probably sent you home with some materials, and probably more are on the mail. It's not a bad idea to set up a filing system for yourself so that when you are ready to work on your applications, you know exactly where each one is.

5.Don't Procrastinate.

Applying to college can be a very scary thing, but don't hide from it. The sooner you get to work on your applications, the better off you'll be.

6.Don't fall prey to senioritis.

This terrible condition strikes many students in their last year of high school. You have been working really hard. Don't put the brakes on now.

7.Stay rested.

To do your best in school and on your applications, make sure you're getting at least eight hours of sleep a day. To accomplish this, you will also have to pay particular attention to Tip #5.

8.Don't stay home on Saturday.

Go out and have some fun. People work more effectively when they mix it up with some downtime.

9.Spend time with friends and family.

Without getting too schmaltzy, you might be moving away next fall. Now is the time to make memories that will last a lifetime.

10.Don't take college application too seriously.

Yes, college is important. But, no, applying to it should not take over your entire life. Don't let the stress and pressure get to you.

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posted by EDUwithPassion in 10/5 Top Tips!,Finding Your Degree,Finding Your School,Finishing H.S. and have Comment (1)

Strut Your Stuff! Make Yourself A Great Scholarship Candidate!

scholarships Strut Your Stuff! Make Yourself A Great Scholarship Candidate!Going to college with scholarships can greatly ease the burden on yourself and your parents. Scholarships are free money to pay for your education, books and room and board. There are scholarships everywhere and for almost anything, and the winner of the scholarship will be the candidate that best presents themselves in their application. Take these ideas under consideration when considering how to make yourself a great candidate!

Academics are the deciding factor on many scholarship awards. Most will have a grade point average (GPA) requirement. Demonstrating your ability to handle your course load and maintain a strong GPA will speak volumes about your aptitude and possibilities for success. When scholarships are awarded based on academics you have to demonstrate your desire to succeed in higher education. This starts with studying hard and doing well in your high school classes. This does not always require a 4.0 or perfect grade point average. SAT/ACT test scores can also give an indication about the possibilities for your success. Dedicate yourself to study time, focused classroom presence and maintaining a healthy balance to do your best and increase academic scholarship eligibility.

Going beyond academics, extra-curricular activities are also important to your profile as a scholarship candidate. Being a member of the drama team, debate team, band, national honor society, foreign language club or Explorer club will demonstrate that you are committed not only to your academic career. It will show that you are a well-rounded individual, and that you can handle academic studies along with social activities that will benefit y our community.

Speaking of benefiting the community, scholarship awards seem to find their ways into the hands of those with a strong sense of community service. Knowing that there is much more beyond yourself and understanding that there are people in need around you is important. Recognizing that need and feeling compelled to volunteer your time and energy to those less fortunate sends a message to scholarship committees that they are spending their money wisely on individuals who care not only about making a difference and succeeding academically, but helping others do so as well. After all, isn't that what scholarships are about?

Being a strong candidate does not depend on the type of scholarship you are applying for, it depends on the type of person applying for the scholarship. Present yourself in the best possible way by showing off your academic success, along with your desire to learn and be a vital part of your community.

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How To Pay For College If Your Parents Can’t

empty hands How To Pay For College If Your Parents CantIf you come from a limited financial background, that's no reason that you shouldn't go to college. In fact, the less financial support you have, the easier it may be to secure financial aid. Financial aid is only given out to the neediest students. That being said, there can be stiff competition for financial aid packages, so you should apply early.

If you are looking to save money on tuition, state schools are much cheaper overall than private schools–especially if you can prove residency. This is not true across the board, however. In special situations, you could potentially get a higher scholarship for a private university than financial aid at your local university. It's important to weigh all of your options. Obviously, the school with the lowest tuition is a good first bet, but there are other factors to consider as well.

A good financial aid or grant program should be able to help with tuition, room and board, and supplies. If the latter is not included, cut costs by buying and selling used textbooks. Room and board can be a huge chunk of expenses–if you can cut costs by living in a shared living space, instead of a dorm, this is recommended. The trade-off is that you will have to make your own meals, but you can save hundreds of dollars a month on rent.

Getting a job is an absolute necessity–and may be mandatory as part of your financial aid package. Many financial aid packages require that you get a job on campus–a sort of pay as you go student loan. This may be preferable to other types of student loans, as you won't be saddled with payments after you graduate. The problem is that your work study paycheck will go right back to the school, which doesn't provide money for other expenses.

Student Loans

Student loans are by far the most popular form of tuition payment: borrow now, pay later. If you get a job during the school year, much of your paycheck will be going in pocket. At the same time, it is important to start paying off your student loan early on. Defaulting on student loan payments after you graduate can have long-term consequences. As you are trying to get footing in the workforce, it can be difficult to have to spend a large chunk of your paycheck on loans.

All that said, there is no reason to not go to college just because your parents cannot afford it. They may be able to meet you halfway by fronting some of the money if you are able to find a loan from somewhere else. Even if they don't help out at all, you can still pay off tuition and other expenses through government loans, private grants, school scholarships, work study programs, and more.

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Can I Automatically Renew My Student Loans Each Year?

When applying for financial aid for undergraduate, graduate or professional degree programs, you’ll likely hear a lot about scholarships touted as being renewable for a year or two at a time.

While scholarships and other forms of non-loan financial aid do have the ability in some cases to renew, student loans generally do not. At least, not in the conventional understanding of the term “automatically renew.”

Meaning, you will probably not receive the exact amount every year, and it will require at least a cursory update of information to the lender, whether it’s the federal government or a private lender.

Starting with federal student loans: the aid definitely does not automatically renew every year. It does not simply replenish every year because the amount you receive depends on your family’s current financial situation and updated government legislation.

So, a renewal of your FAFSA (Free Application For Student Aid) every year is necessary. An online personal identification number will be sent to returning students each year for online applications, or a student will be required to fill out a paper renewal to make the changes.

Private loans may require a less rigorous change process each year or semester, but there will still be some, for many of the same reasons a federal loan does, minus the federal guidelines.

Financial aid need needs to be evaluated each year or semester to account for a student’s evolving circumstances, as well as that of the economic and legislative environment, to make sure there is fairness in distribution of the aid.

A student’s tuition, housing or expenses might go up one year or semester, making it necessary to increase their aid amount. He or she might have become eligible or non-eligible for scholarships, grant programs or work-study situations that might impact the amount of money needed.

Additionally, his or her family finances could alter slightly or dramatically, making adjustments in the FAFSA or private loan calculation necessary.

Academic progress is an important factor in determining a student’s aid package each year, especially with regard to federal loans. If a student does not maintain a satisfactory grade point average, course load or has some disciplinary actions taken against him or her, aid could be restructured.

Funding and allowances from state, federal and university endowments might change, making the amount of funding from these sources fluctuate and the need to pull money from other private or federal sources necessary.

So, when considering your financial aid needs, remember that they are not automatically renewed each year, although major pieces of information (name, social security number, credit history, tax history) remain on your permanent file and the bulk of your initial information will probably not have to be redone.

Be sure to stay organized and aware of any “new” or “renewal” application dates, and submit all your paperwork on time. This will ensure a smooth financial aid transition throughout all the years you are in school, and be as close to an “automatic renewal” as possible.

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Do Employers Mind If My Degree Is From An Online University?

Maybe you're considering getting a degree from an online university. Maybe you've just earned one and in preparing to apply for new jobs that will make the most of it, you're wondering whether or not prospective employers will see your resume and have bad associations with your online degree. In a word, the answer is no.

Employers who require employees to have a college degree care that you have one from somewhere. Traditionally, there are about 20 colleges in the United States (the Ivies and a handful of other prominent schools) that make employers sit up and take notice about where your degree came from. If you did not attend one of these places, you are like most people, who find that the name of their school is less important to their employers than how they performed academically, and what they studied.

In fact, your online degree may set you apart in a positive way from the rest of the pack of applicants. Successfully obtaining your degree online tells prospective employers that you are a person who will get the job done even when no one is looking. Online degrees testify that their recipients are self-motivated individuals who are capable of managing multiple priorities. And whatever job you're applying for, rest assured that those are two qualities all organizations prize.

Furthermore, online universities are becoming more and more popular. While your online degree can set you apart in the aforementioned ways, you should have no fear that it will stigmatize you. Each day, it becomes more and more likely that the person you sit down to interview with may have attended the same online school that you did!

Another benefit of the online university experience in the eyes of employers is that it is designed in large part for working professionals. The fact that you've made it through an online degree program tells your prospective employer that you have had intense exposure to the types of collegial interactions you will face in the working world. Online universities emphasize and develop the ability to work with others, to manage and meet deadlines, and to be responsible for learning on your own. When you consider all of the things a degree from an online university says about you, you should realize that you're more of a proven commodity, a "safer" hire than recent graduates from brick and mortar universities.

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Jobs Shmobs Who Needs A Job?! Get A Career NOW!!!

Physician and medical assisting is a key element of the evolving health care system. Physician and medical assistants lighten the load of the managing physician, act as the physician’s eyes and ears for at least the initial visit and help keep costs down for not only patients but insurance companies. With the aging population and the sheer increase in patient numbers, the demand for physician and medical assistants will continue to grow. The difference between working in physician and medical assisting is that the medical assistant is responsible for clerical and clinical duties. The physician assistant, on the other hand, not only manages medical assistants but can write prescriptions, make diagnoses, record medical histories, read x-rays and examine patients.

Studying Physician and Medical Assisting

To earn a degree and work in physician and medical assisting, two years of schooling is generally required plus hands-on experience in a health care environment. Accredited programs are generally associated with medical schools. Most physician and medical assisting students have a bachelor’s degree and some programs require it. Prerequisites such as math, biology, psychology, English and chemistry should be taken before applying to any physician and medical assisting program. A typical physician and medical assisting program consists of courses in pharmacology, medical ethics, human anatomy, geriatrics and disease prevention. There is also a clinical element in which the student works under supervision in areas such as emergency medicine, surgery, obstetrics and gynecology.

Working in Physician and Medical Assisting

It is not possible to work as a physician assistant or medical assistant unless you pass the Physician Assistants National Certifying Examination and graduate from an accredited program. Just as doctors can specialize in a preferred area of medicine, so can physician and medical assistants. Some specialty areas include internal medicine, pediatrics, emergency medicine and surgery. Physician and medical assistants often work in hospitals, offices, medical facilities and public clinics.

Online Continuing Education in Physician and Medical Assisting

While there aren’t accredited programs online for physician and medical assistants, there are online programs for degree completion and continuing education once certification has been achieved. Many working in physician and medical assisting will complete master’s degrees online and further specialize in such areas as public health or administration. Many universities offer online and distance learning programs for these purposes.

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Free Money??!! Apply For A College Scholarship Now!!

Have you started applying for your scholarship yet? No? WHY NOT!?! This is free money for your education. Following these quick and easy steps will help make this process painless.

First, Eliminate the Scholarships That Don’t Apply To You
There are many scholarships available for people who want to attend college. The most practical approach to winning the money you need or want to go to school is to do some research and figure out the scholarships for which you’re eligible. Because of the overwhelming amount of scholarships out there, you will save yourself a lot of time and potentially wasted effort if you identify at the outset of your process which scholarships just don’t apply to you.

Next, Make A List of the Scholarships That You Are Most Likely To Receive
Once you’ve eliminated the list of scholarships that have nothing to do with you, you’ll probably see that the amount of scholarships is still pretty large. Of course, this is basically good news, but if you are eligible for a very large number, the clock might run out on you before you have a chance to apply to them all. To mitigate this possibility, take your research skills in a different direction by learning about the scholarships you could apply to and prioritizing the ones that you most would like to receive, and/or have the best chance of receiving.

Look Around — Are There Experts Available To You Who Can Help You In Your Quest?
The above tasks may sound daunting. Before you get too overwhelmed, ask yourself if there is someone who could help you make sense of all of the scholarships. If you are still in high school, before you do anything, you should make an appointment with your guidance counselor and let him or her help you figure out which scholarships might be the best for you, as well as which ones you are the likeliest to be awarded. If you’ve been out of high school for a while and are looking to get that college degree, chances are there’s someone in your current circle of friends, maybe someone who’s already been to college and been through this, who can help you cut through all the paperwork to get to the scholarships that are best for you.

Don’t Forget The Internet When It Comes To Tracking Down Scholarships
There are a number of Web resources at your disposal to aid you in your search for money for college. For example, Fastweb.com is a very popular site devoted to helping people match them up with scholarships for which they’re eligible. A great feature of a site like Fastweb.com is that once you enter your profile information on the site, it will e-mail you with news about upcoming scholarship deadlines.

And of course, regardless of how you find out about your scholarships, as soon as you determine which ones you’ll go after, the most important thing is to request the application materials and complete them as soon as possible.

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What to Do with Your Summer Break

Most college and universities start their summer break in early to mid-May. The return date is usually in August or September. There is a drastic difference between having a full schedule of classes, studying and paper writing and then having nothing to do. What do you do with all of this free time? There are many ways to fill the time during your summer break.

Signing up for a few hours of summer school might be a great way to pass the time while earning some additional credits towards your degree. It might make your degree plan a little easier and get your college career over a little sooner. Check with your college or university to see if you might be able to go back to your hometown, take credits at a community college and transfer the credits back to your school. This might make it easier to get some of your prerequisite classes out of the way and be home to visit with friends and family.

If you have decided not to earn any school credits over the summer, then take the opportunity to go home. Visit family and friends. Spending time with family will be important because if you are not going to school in your hometown, time with family is especially precious. Summer offers several opportunities to have large gatherings like Memorial Day or Fourth of July.

Summer is a perfect time to catch up with old friends from high school or your hometown. Start in the first part of the year, talk to your old friends and arrange a get together. Take the time to suggest a group vacation. The options are endless, you could go camping, on a cruise, skiing or go exploring overseas.

No matter where you land during summer break, a great option is to get a summer job. Working during the regular school term can be difficult and money can get tight. Most students tend to be on tight budgets. A summer job can be a good opportunity to make some cash that will get you through the year. Check with theme parks, local shopping malls, country clubs and daycare centers, or check in with the campus career center to find out about available summer employment.

Summer break presents lots of options for each and every type of student. Depending on your preferences and what your total overall goals are, the above suggestions should give you some ideas to get started on your planning.

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How To Pay For College When Your Parents Can't

If you come from a limited financial background, that’s no reason that you shouldn’t go to college. In fact, the less financial support you have, the easier it may be to secure financial aid. Financial aid is only given out to the neediest students. That being said, there can be stiff competition for financial aid packages, so you should apply early.

If you are looking to save money on tuition, state schools are much cheaper overall than private schools–especially if you can prove residency. This is not true across the board, however. In special situations, you could potentially get a higher scholarship for a private university than financial aid at your local university. It’s important to weigh all of your options. Obviously, the school with the lowest tuition is a good first bet, but there are other factors to consider as well.

A good financial aid or grant program should be able to help with tuition, room and board, and supplies. If the latter is not included, cut costs by buying and selling used textbooks. Room and board can be a huge chunk of expenses–if you can cut costs by living in a shared living space, instead of a dorm, this is recommended. The trade-off is that you will have to make your own meals, but you can save hundreds of dollars a month on rent.

Getting a job is an absolute necessity–and may be mandatory as part of your financial aid package. Many financial aid packages require that you get a job on campus–a sort of pay as you go student loan. This may be preferable to other types of student loans, as you won’t be saddled with payments after you graduate. The problem is that your work study paycheck will go right back to the school, which doesn’t provide money for other expenses.

Student Loans

Student loans are by far the most popular form of tuition payment: borrow now, pay later. If you get a job during the school year, much of your paycheck will be going in pocket. At the same time, it is important to start paying off your student loan early on. Defaulting on student loan payments after you graduate can have long-term consequences. As you are trying to get footing in the workforce, it can be difficult to have to spend a large chunk of your paycheck on loans.

All that said, there is no reason to not go to college just because your parents cannot afford it. They may be able to meet you halfway by fronting some of the money if you are able to find a loan from somewhere else. Even if they don’t help out at all, you can still pay off tuition and other expenses through government loans, private grants, school scholarships, work study programs, and more.

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Are YOU Applying For Student Loans? Read This!

As the costs of higher education continue to rise, increasing numbers of students and parents are relying on loans to help pay for college. In order to successfully manage this debt, it is important to understand the loan process, including how student loans work, the types of loans available, and applying for loans. If you need additional money beyond savings, grants, and scholarships, consider accepting a student loan to pay the expenses associated with your education.

How do student loans work?

Loans allow students to borrow money to help pay for the costs associated with higher education. Payment of such loans can typically be deferred until the student has graduated from school. The U.S. Department of Education administers loans funded through the federal government. Federal loans are made available either by providing money directly to colleges and universities or by connecting students with private loans.

Types of Loans

1. Federal Stafford Loans: Federal Stafford Loans are available to both undergraduate and graduate students and must be repaid. First-year undergraduate students are eligible for up to a $2,625 loan. Second-year students can borrow up to $3,500 and up to $5,500 each following year. The total amount borrowed by dependent students can exceed no more than $23,000.

Graduate students can borrow more through Federal Stafford Loans, but the government can subsidize only $8,500 of this debt. Eligible graduate students can borrow up to $18,500 each year, but can borrow no more than a total of $138,500 during both undergraduate and graduate study.

The interest rate on Federal Stafford Loans varies, but will not exceed 8.25-percent. For qualifying students, the government will pay the interest while the student is in school. These subsidized loans are offered based on financial need and can save a considerable amount of money in interest. Students who do not qualify for subsidized loans will be expected to pay back the full amount of their loans plus accrued interest.

2. Federal PLUS Loans: Federal PLUS loans are loans made to the parents of students. To be eligible for a Federal PLUS Loan, students must be enrolled at least part-time at a participating college or university. Federal PLUS loans are very similar to Stafford loans, except they are made directly to the parent instead of the student. Parents may borrow up to the full amount of the student’s total tuition. Unlike Stafford loans, parents must begin to repay PLUS loans immediately.

3. Perkins Loans: Federal Perkins Loans are funded by the government and made available through individual colleges and universities. These loans are available to eligible undergraduate and graduate students who are enrolled full-time and meet all the requirements established by the individual college or university. Consult a financial aid or admissions counselor at your university of choice to learn more about the institution’s specific requirements. Perkins loans are offered at a low interest rate of 5-percent. Undergraduates can borrow a maximum amount of $4,000 per year, while graduate students can borrow up to $6,000 per year. Repayment of Federal Perkins Loans begins nine months after graduation and students have up to 10 years to repay the amount borrowed.

How do you apply for a loan?

Applying for loans through the United States government is accomplished by filling out a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Paper applications can be found at the counselor’s office of your local school, but you can also fill out an online application at the FAFSA website. Students will need to request a PIN number before filling out the application online. For maximum financial aid benefits, complete an application sometime between January and March for the next school year. Some financial aid programs require an early application in order to qualify.

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